Medical surgeon participating in gene therapy trial to slow vision loss

0

A Baltimore doctor has performed the first surgery in Maryland as part of a national clinical trial aimed at slowing the progression of what is called dry macular degeneration. Eric Suan, a retinal surgeon at the Retina Care Center, said the degeneration leads to vision loss once affected. And it can be a little or a lot, depending on how much tissue is lost due to dry age-related macular degeneration. “The typical patient who comes to see me has central vision loss,” Suan said. “They just can’t read, they have difficulty driving, so that’s a huge impairment for the patients.” Because the tissue cannot be regenerated, the goal is to slow progression. A Drug Administration-approved investigational clinical trial that involves a one-time surgical procedure using a patient’s own cells to create more of a certain protein considered weak in patients with this eye disease. , we actually inject these genes under the retina and instruct the cells to produce more of this protein,” Suan said. Suan said research is crucial when it comes to a quality of life issue like vision. for them,” Suan said. For more information on trials, visit this website.

A Baltimore doctor has performed the first surgery in Maryland as part of a national clinical trial aimed at slowing the progression of what is called dry macular degeneration.

Dr. Eric Suan, a retinal surgeon at the Retina Care Center, said the degeneration leads to vision loss once affected. And it can be a little or a lot, depending on how much tissue is lost due to dry age-related macular degeneration.

“The typical patient who comes to see me has central vision loss,” Suan said. “They just can’t read, they have trouble driving, and so that’s a huge impairment for the patients.”

Because the tissue cannot be regenerated, the goal is to slow progression.

Suan is part of a nationwide Food and Drug Administration-approved investigational clinical trial that involves a one-time surgical procedure using a patient’s own cells to create more of a certain protein thought to be weak in patients with this eye disease.

“It’s a very new technique. It’s gene therapy. So we’re actually injecting these genes under the retina and telling the cells to produce more of this protein,” Suan said.

Suan said clinical trials are still in their early stages, but early detection is key, which makes eye exams important. Suan said research is crucial when it comes to a quality of life issue like vision.

“Do you want your grandmother and your beloved grandfather to be able to continue driving to maintain their independence? That’s really the most important thing to them,” Suan said.

For more information on trials, visit this website.

[related id=’40bcf202-67a2-4dd2-87e8-1cea97c42a23′ align=’center’][/related]

Share.

Comments are closed.